Tag Archives: Cold Chisel

Eighties Guitar Masters

Yep. Another blog post requiring difficult decisions. Please note there is no order of merit in this list.

thorogood

The man in front of the Delaware Destroyers – the inimitable George Thorogood

I remember being totally enamoured by his hit “Bad To The Bone” the instant I heard it. Even more so after seeing the music video with Bo Diddley. For my eighteenth birthday I received a copy of his album George Thorogood Live as a gift. I loved it. After realising most of the tracks were covers, I made it my mission to track down the original versions. So thanks to George I ended up discovering all these fantastic blues artists from the fifties and sixties.

Choice Pick: I’m still enamoured by 1982’s “Bad To The Bone”

satriani

Virtuoso guitarist and one-time guitar tutor, Joe Satriani

Any Satriani fan owes a debt to Steve Vai. When Steve Vai signed with a record label he asked them to check out his guitar teacher, leading to a recording contract for Satch as well. Aside from Vai, other former Satch students include Larry LaLonde from Primus and Testament’s Alex Skolnick. Apparently the last guitar lesson he gave, for the princely sum of $20, was to Metallica’s Kirk Hammett.

Choice Pick: Hard to go past 1987’s “Surfing With The Alien” 

gambale

Canberra export, Frank Gambale

Canberra-born jazz fusion guitarist Frank Gambale, remains largely unknown in his home country outside of jazz circles.Yet the twenty-album veteran is world renowned for his sweep picking and economy picking techniques. As well as a solo career he had a six year stint with the Chick Corea Elektric Band. Worth tracking him down if jazz fusion is your bag.

Choice Pick: “Credit Reference Blues” from his debut album, Brave New Guitar

knopfler

Fingerstyle guitarist, film composer and songwriter extraordinaire, Mark Knopfler

When Dire Straits burst onto the scene in the late seventies no one could have predicted how meteoric their rise would be. The 1985 album Brothers In Arms would be a massive worldwide success on the back of singles “Money For Nothing”, “Walk Of Life” and “So Far Away”. Mark has had a successful solo career since the demise of Dire Straits releasing solo albums and composing film soundtracks. I still think the album before Brothers In Arms, 1982’s Love Over Gold, is an absolute masterpiece, overshadowed by the success of its follow-up.

Choice Pick: The epic “Telegraph Road” from Love Over Gold

marr

Influential guitarist, Johnny Marr

Cutting his teeth co-writing and performing with Morrissey in The Smiths, Johnny Marr’s career has been as diverse as it has been influential. Since leaving The Smiths he has performed with The The, Electronic, Modest Mouse and Neil Finn’s 7 Worlds Collide project as well as releasing solo material.

Choice Pick: The eerie-sounding guitar work on “How Soon Is Now?” by The Smiths

moss

Guitarist with a penchant for playing barefoot, Ian Moss

Ian Moss has had a very successful career with Aussie legends Cold Chisel. Taking a break from music after the breakup of Cold Chisel in 1984, he returned with a vengeance in 1989 launching a successful solo career with his debut solo album, Matchbook. His playing was integral to Cold Chisel’s sound and this was once again evident after their reformation in 1998.

Choice Pick: The self-penned “Bow River” from the classic album Circus Animals

malmsteen

Swedish metal guitarist, Yngwie Malmsteen

Yngwie Malmsteen made an impact right off the bat, performing on albums with Steeler and Graham Bonnet’s Alcatrazz in 1983 when he was only 20 years of age. He released Rising Force the following year launching a solo career based around his neoclassical metal style of guitar playing. His playing has influenced many others since, but his own influences include Queen’s Brian May and 19th century composer Paganini.

vaughan

The late Stevie Ray Vaughan

Stevie Ray Vaughan, with his band Double Trouble, reinvigorated the blues rock scene in the eighties. His style was unique and heavily influential on his peers. He was much sought after as a session musician appearing on material by David Bowie, Jennifer Warnes and James Brown. He was also one of the few guitarists he could successfully cover Jimi Hendrix without sounding like a pale imitation.

Choice Pick: “Cold Shot” from 1984’s Couldn’t Stand The Weather

slash

Lead guitarist with Guns ‘N’ Roses, Slash

Guns ‘N’ Roses seemed to come out of nowhere in 1987. You can thank Saul Hudson, aka Slash, for the large part he played in their success. The sublime riff from “Sweet Child o’ Mine” contributed to high-rotation airplay on radios and televisions all around the world. The fact he has also had success with Slash’s Snakepit, Velvet Revolver and with his solo material, is testament to his talents.

Choice Pick: The aforementioned “Sweet Child o’ Mine” from Appetite For Destruction

the-edge

U2 guitarist, The Edge, aka David Evans

Never one to rest on his laurels, Irish guitarist The Edge, has kept himself busy outside of his work with U2 by contributing to various human rights and philanthropic causes, collaborating with other musicians and contributing to the soundtracks of theatre musicals. Despite all the musical style changes U2 has gone through over the years, The Edge’s playing has been continually at the core of their sound.

Choice Pick: “Sunday Bloody Sunday” from U2’s 1983 album, War

Albums of the Month

It’s now been just over 12 months since I commenced my feature “Albums of the Month” on my community radio program The Sunday Smorgasbord as heard on TYGA FM. The idea behind the feature was to provide listeners with several tracks from one of my favourite albums each month with the aim of giving a better indication of what an album is like. Hopefully those liking what they have heard would then obtain the album for themselves. It harks back to why I got involved in community radio in the first place. To share my music with others. I felt I had no choice but to begin with one of my favourite albums of all time, Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs by Derek and the Dominos.

A personal favourite, Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs released by Derek & The Dominos in 1970.

A personal favourite,
Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs
released by Derek & The Dominos in 1970.

I’ve always been a big fan and supporter of Australian music so I’ve made certain to include some classic Australian albums as well, not just those from international artists.

INXS's Shabooh Shoobah, released in 1982.

INXS’s Shabooh Shoobah,
released in 1982.

Each of the albums I feature also have to have resonated with me on some level in the first place. In some cases I can even remember the circumstances of where and when I first heard them. There is only ever one first listen.

The 1971 album from the Stones, the seminal Sticky Fingers

The 1971 album from the Stones,
the seminal Sticky Fingers

Australia’s musical landscape has always heavily featured both US & UK artists, as well as our own, so it was inevitable that my “Albums of the Month” would too.

Cold Chisel's 1982 album, Circus Animals

Cold Chisel’s 1982 album,
Circus Animals

The classic Darkness On The Edge Of Town, released by The Boss in 1978

The classic Darkness On The Edge Of Town,
released by The Boss in 1978

I’ve always believed that most music-lovers like to hear a little bit of everything, the whole modus operandi of my radio program. I always advise listeners if they don’t like what’s playing, just wait five minutes, because the next one will be different. Hopefully, over time, the artists I’ve featured in my “Albums of the Month” will also illustrate the diversity of my taste.

Human Frailty, a classic Hunters & Collectors album, released in 1986.

Human Frailty, a classic
Hunters & Collectors album,
released in 1986.

Blood Sugar Sex Magick, the 1991 album from the Red Hot Chili Peppers

Blood Sugar Sex Magick,
the 1991 album from the
Red Hot Chili Peppers

I’ve also tried to feature albums from different eras and different genres. But ultimately we are limited by our own experiences. Some albums featured will be ones I grew up with, whilst others I will have discovered later in life due to either their release date or when I eventually became aware of them.

Daisies of the Galaxy, an album released in 2000 by Eels

Daisies of the Galaxy,
an album released in 2000 by Eels

When January rolls around my first show of the year always features my favourite music released in the previous 12 months. I call it my “Year In Review Special”. Consequently I decided to make the January album of the month my favourite one released the previous year. For 2014 that was the one released by Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators.

World On Fire from Slash, featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators. My pick of 2014.

World On Fire from Slash,
featuring Myles Kennedy
& The Conspirators.
My pick of 2014.

I can remember some Regurgitator fans being disappointed with their change in sound on their second album. The band embraced their reaction in advance kicking off the album with the hilarious I Like Your Old Stuff Better Than Your New Stuff. Personally, I thought Unit was brilliant.

Regurgitator's second album, Unit, released in 1997.

Regurgitator’s second album, Unit,
released in 1997.

Some albums also indicate a change in direction for an artist or hint what is about to come. Hunky Dory did this brilliantly, bringing together the musicians that would become The Spiders From Mars as well as demonstrating that David Bowie’s songwriting had reached another level since The Man Who Sold The World album.

The album that culminated in the formation of The Spiders From Mars, David Bowie's Hunky Dory released in 1971.

The album that culminated
in the formation of
The Spiders From Mars,
David Bowie’s Hunky Dory
released in 1971.

This brings me to this month’s “Album of the Month” from Queen. Although they would release another two studio albums before his death, A Kind Of Magic would be the last studio album to be accompanied by a tour from the Freddie Mercury era of the band. The tour ended up leading to some of their finest live performances, none better than their performance at Knebworth, thankfully captured on film for posterity.

A Kind Of Magic by Queen, the unofficial Highlander soundtrack, released in 1986

A Kind Of Magic by Queen,
the unofficial Highlander soundtrack,
released in 1986

So there we have a baker’s dozen of albums I’ve featured on the program. So to quote Molly Meldrum, “Do yourself a favour”, add some of these to your music collection, you won’t regret it.

Don’t forget you can listen to my program 8pm Sunday nights on 98.9 TYGA FM here in the beautiful Derwent Valley, stream online at http://www.tygafm.org.au or listen with your mobile device via the TuneIn app.